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Rejoicing in the Church of Poetry

01 Feb

(PHOTO: Steven Pinker)

I’m coming off a high after graduation last month. I finished the Stonecoast M.F.A. Low-Residency Program at the University of Southern Maine, a two-year journey I started for time to write and complete another manuscript to shop around.

It allowed me to expand my network, see Maine (a place I otherwise would not have visited), and to work with National Book Award Finalist Tim Seibles. While he was the hook, Stonecoast introduced me to other faculty members with invaluable insights: Marilyn Nelson, Joy Harjo, Scott WolvenAnnie Finch, David Anthony Durham, Jeanne Marie Beaumont, Suzanne Strempek Shea, and Cait Johnson.

That high, in part, resulted from my last residency experience—where I spoke on a panel about third semester projects, introduced Tim Seibles before his reading and Q&A, conducted an hour-long seminar on collaborations, and got an amazing intro from Tim at the Graduating Student Reading. My wife, parents, and sister flew in, met the faculty, and fellow Stonecoasters.

I rode that high back to D.C., determined that nothing would kill it—not even Alexandra Petri’s Washington Post column “Is Poetry Dead?,” which dumped Poetry in a hospice. “Can a poem still change anything?” she wrote. “I think the medium might not be loud enough any longer.” That most people I encounter share Petri’s sentiment doesn’t surprise me. In fact, the anti-poetry comments bombard me: from my dad constantly asking how writers feed themselves, to “good for you” responses after people hear I’m a published poet, to the forced smile my wife’s sorority sister gave me when she found out what an M.F.A. (Masters of Fine Arts) was and what I studied.

I shook my head after a poetry buddy told me about an unsuccessful spoken word artist who recently said, “I don’t do that poetry shit anymore.” When the anti-poets spew their rhetoric, I’m grateful for this excerpt of Donald Hall’s 1989 essay, “Death to the Death of Poetry”:

After college many English majors stop reading contemporary poetry. Why not? They become involved in journalism or scholarship, essay writing or editing, brokerage or social work; they backslide from the undergraduate Church of Poetry. Years later, glancing belatedly at the poetic scene, they tell us that poetry is dead. They left poetry; therefore they blame poetry for leaving them. Really, they lament their own aging. Don’t we all? But some of us do not blame the current poets.

The Church of Poetry ain’t short on hallelujahs—not when poetry’s still read at weddings and funerals, not when people turn to poets or attempt to write their own verse on Valentine’s Day or anytime they declare their love for someone special. Could it be what Cait Johnson once said, that “poetry is a shortcut to empathy,” and that “poetry gets at the soul faster”?

My soul sambaed the evening I watched a couple wait for a table at the 14th and V streets Busboys and Poets in D.C. Attempting to woo his wife, the husband pulled a random poetry book off the shelf, an action prompted by his wife’s question some time before: “Why don’t you read me poetry?”

After reading a few poems aloud, he said, “This is really good.” He bought the book, then, hearing the author was present, asked the poet to pose with him for a photo. When the host called their name, the husband shook the poet’s hand and said that book will help their marriage.

(PHOTO: DCCWW) Students in the D.C. Creative Writing Workshop’s After-School Writing Club.

The gospel doesn’t stop there. I’d love to take Alexandra Petri to Hart Middle School in D.C.’s most neglected community (the Congress Heights neighborhood in the city’s southeast quadrant). Every week, she’d see kids, who thought they didn’t like poetry, laughing as they scribbled their raps.

She’d see a 7th grader sweat each line of his poem about going to visit his dad’s grave that day after school. She’d see an 8th grader writing about her dual heritages (a Jamaican dad and Panamanian mom).

If after all that, Petri said, “That’s nice, but shouldn’t they be doing something more practical,” I’d turn her attention to a 2007 interview, where Bill Moyers asked poet Martín Espada the same thing. “Well, for me, poetry is practical,” Espada said. “Poetry will help them survive to the extent that poetry helps them maintain their dignity, helps them maintain their sense of self respect. They will be better suited to defend themselves in the world. And so I think it– poetry makes that practical contribution.”

I’d love to take Petri to Duke Ellington School of the Arts on the well-to-do side of town, where she’d see  a 10th grader using poetry to deal with her mother’s passing last year. I wonder how she’d feel about her thesis after watching a classroom of students fired up after reading a poem about the ill-treatment of a hit and run victim.

I wish she could hear those 10th graders calling America on her hypocrisies before writing their own poems in the hit and run victim’s voice—addressing the drivers who honked their horns, the detectives who swapped jokes above her, or the shaken witness who stole the crime scene spotlight. I’d turn to Petri and–imitating Espada’s voice–say, “You just saw poetry make ‘…the abstract concrete…the general specific and particular.'”

(PHOTO: Stock Image)

I’d recommend the Post columnist shadow poet Patricia Smith on one of her school visits through Chicago. I’d like to see Petri’s reaction when Nicole asks Smith to help her remember her mother she lost to drug addiction.

I’d send Petri to Durham, NC, where Dr. Randall Horton brings poetry to a halfway house where he was once a resident. I could imagine Petri speechless, watching those men and women count haiku syllables on their fingers. She might even yell “Damn!” when a guy’s poem reminisces about a fine woman’s sundress that was “ghetto dandelion yellow.”

It’s obvious Alexandra Petri’s out of the loop. “The problem with her column is simple. It’s breathtakingly uninformed,” DC poet Joseph Ross wrote in a blog post, which listed a literary institution and contemporary local poets. Ross even offered to show Petri other places where Poetry lives in D.C. “Alexandra, let me take you to a poetry reading,” he wrote. “Let me introduce you to the poetry world in Washington, D.C., that I know. Maybe I’ll even give you a poetry book.”

And that’s nice, considering what every poet wanted to give Petri. Her column wasn’t just “breathtakingly uninformed”; it was offensive. The poets expressed this through the cyber beat down they gave Petri. I’m talking about angry comments posted to her column, an open letter with a reading list, and “irate tweets calling me ‘pretty [expletiving] stupid,’” Petri recalled in a follow-up column, retracting her initial thesis.

But a few thrown stones don’t stop the Church of Poetry from rejoicing, which brings me back to my high and my M.F.A. degree. I could go into what poetry did for me, but I’ve done that enough (plus, it’s on my “About” page). For those who don’t know, this Poetry Church is so funky the gospel wafts like cannabis clouds in a hotboxed car. We welcome nonbelievers to catch contact highs. There’s always room in the cipher.

 
20 Comments

Posted by on February 1, 2013 in Essay

 

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20 responses to “Rejoicing in the Church of Poetry

  1. Melody Fuller

    February 1, 2013 at 1:07 pm

    Alan: Have Amy add you and your blog to this page. http://stonecoastcommunity.com/alumni/ LOVE,

    Melody Date: Fri, 1 Feb 2013 17:10:24 +0000 To: starwriter1@msn.com

     
    • Alan King

      February 1, 2013 at 1:08 pm

      Thanks, Melody. I’ll jump on that!

       
    • grace cavalieri

      February 1, 2013 at 1:26 pm

      GOOD JOB ALAN.

       
      • Alan King

        February 1, 2013 at 1:49 pm

        Thank you, Grace!

         
  2. Ashley Mack-Jackson

    February 1, 2013 at 2:23 pm

    Having such a down day until I read this! This will be promptly posted on my Facebook! Thank you for putting it all in perspective Alan!

     
    • Alan King

      February 1, 2013 at 4:04 pm

      Thanks, Ashley. I’m grateful for the folks who bombarded Petri’s inbox, Twitter account, and column.

       
  3. ummqamarblogs

    February 1, 2013 at 7:30 pm

    Hallelujah!

     
  4. weston33

    February 2, 2013 at 12:44 am

    You are the deacon of the poetry church Alan King thanks for reminding us that the doors of the church are always open.

     
    • Alan King

      February 2, 2013 at 12:53 am

      Thanks. That means a lot coming from you, playa!

       
  5. josephross

    February 2, 2013 at 9:20 am

    Nice work, Alan. I’ll join your church! Hallelujahs all ’round.

     
    • Alan King

      February 2, 2013 at 12:15 pm

      Thanks, Joe:-)

       
  6. chooseyou2

    February 2, 2013 at 9:44 am

    Simply wonderful. Now let the church say Amen.

     
  7. GaryCopelandLilley

    February 2, 2013 at 9:50 am

    Alan, congrats on your accomplishments at Stonecoast and beyond. And thank you for testifying, giving a reflection of your faith in the Church of Poetry. Amen.

     
    • Alan King

      February 2, 2013 at 12:42 pm

      Thanks.

       
  8. DesiValentine

    February 2, 2013 at 11:08 am

    Congratulations!!! I still have a year to go on my MA and am facing a similar glut of negative feedback from family on my chosen specialization. “What do writer’s do?” or, more specifically, “How do writers eat?” (Evidently, and MBA and an office/prison would be more appropriate for me.) Well, we can’t live on words, that’s true. But the words themselves make life worth living. Rant on, Alan. Sooner or later the choir will life them and the Church will be welcomed by everyone. :-)

     
    • Alan King

      February 2, 2013 at 12:41 pm

      Thanks, Desi.

       
  9. Tamra

    February 3, 2013 at 10:57 am

    Yes! Thank you for such an important essay, Alan. I just had one of the best days of my life the other day when my scientist husband introduced me to colleagues, not as a teacher as usual, but as a POET. I know now he finally gets it. And with the help you’re giving them, so can the rest of the world. – Tamra

     
    • Alan King

      February 3, 2013 at 11:35 am

      I’m glad your husband gets it. I know that feeling. You’d think in a family of computer folks (from software coders to hardware constructors) they’d belittle what I do, but it’s the opposite. My cousins are always asking me about writing, and they light up when I list my favorite poets, quote them, and break down the poets’ works. They obviously get it. Happy for you :-)

       
  10. Rooze

    February 7, 2013 at 1:04 pm

    Amen, Alan. Thanks for taking the time to pen a much needed, and entirely spot on, post on the relevance and importance of poetry. So grateful that our paths crossed at Stonecoast.

     
    • Alan King

      February 7, 2013 at 2:09 pm

      Thanks, Rooze. I’m glad our paths crossed, too :-)

       

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